Jupyter Notebooks: A Data Scientist's Best Friend

This week's episode is just in time for JupyterCon in NYC, August 22-25...

Jupyter notebooks are probably familiar to a lot of data nerds out there as a great open-source tool for exploring data, doing quick visualizations, and packaging code snippets with explanations for sharing your work with others.  If you're not a data person, or you are but you haven't tried out Jupyter notebooks yet, here's your nudge to go give them a try.  In this episode we'll go back to the old days, before notebooks, and talk about all the ways that data scientists like to work that wasn't particularly well-suited to the command line + text editor setup, and talk about how notebooks have evolved over their lifetime to become even more powerful and well-suited to the data scientist's workflow.

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Curing Cancer with Machine Learning is Super Hard

Today, a dispatch on what can go wrong when machine learning hype outpaces reality: a high-profile partnership between IBM Watson and MD Anderson Cancer Center has recently hit the rocks as it turns out to be tougher than expected to cure cancer with artificial intelligence.  There are enough conflicting accounts in the media to make it tough to say exactly went wrong, but it's a good chance to remind ourselves that even in a post-AI world, hard problems remain hard.  

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Kullback Leibler Divergence

Kullback Leibler divergence, or KL divergence, is a measure of information loss when you try to approximate one distribution with another distribution.  It comes to us originally from information theory, but today underpins other, more machine-learning-focused algorithms like t-SNE.  And boy oh boy can it be tough to explain.  But we're trying our hardest in this episode!

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Sabermetrics

It's moneyball time!  SABR (the Society for American Baseball Research) is the world's largest organization of statistics-minded baseball enthusiasts, who are constantly applying the craft of scientific analysis to trying to figure out who are the best baseball teams and players.  It can be hard to objectively measure sports greatness, but baseball has a data-rich history and plenty of nerdy fans interested in analyzing that data.  In this episode we'll dissect a few of the metrics from standard baseball and compare them to related metrics from Sabermetrics, so you can nerd out more effectively at your next baseball game.

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What Data Scientists Can Learn from Software Engineers

We're back again with friend of the pod Walt, former software engineer extraordinaire and current data scientist extraordinaire, to talk about some best practices from software engineering that are ready to jump the fence over to data science.  If last week's episode was for software engineers who are interested in becoming more like data scientists, then this week's episode is for data scientists who are looking to improve their game with best practices from software engineering.

From Software Engineering to Data Science

Data scientists and software engineers often work side by side, building out and scaling technical products and services that are data-heavy but also require a lot of software engineering to build and maintain.  In this episode, we'll chat with a Friend of the Pod named Walt, who started out as a software engineer but works as a data scientist now.  We'll talk about that transition from software engineering to data science, and what special capabilities software engineers have that data scientists might benefit from knowing about (and vice versa).

Re-Release: Fighting Cholera with Data, 1854

This episode was first released in November 2014.

In the 1850s, there were a lot of things we didn’t know yet: how to create an airplane, how to split an atom, or how to control the spread of a common but deadly disease: cholera.

When a cholera outbreak in London killed scores of people, a doctor named John Snow used it as a chance to study whether the cause might be very small organisms that were spreading through the water supply (the prevailing theory at the time was miasma, or “bad air”). By tracing the geography of all the deaths from the outbreak, Snow was practicing elementary data science--and stumbled upon one of history’s most famous outliers.

In this episode, we’ll tell you more about this single data point, a case of cholera that cracked the case wide open for Snow and provided critical validation for the germ theory of disease.

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Re-release: The Enron Dataset

This episode was first release in February 2015.

In 2000, Enron was one of the largest and companies in the world, praised far and wide for its innovations in energy distribution and many other markets. By 2002, it was apparent that many bad apples had been cooking the books, and billions of dollars and thousands of jobs disappeared.

In the aftermath, surprisingly, one of the greatest datasets in all of machine learning was born--the Enron emails corpus. Hundreds of thousands of emails amongst top executives were made public; there's no realistic chance any dataset like this will ever be made public again.

But the dataset that was released has gone on to immortality, serving as the basis for a huge variety of advances in machine learning and other fields.

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Anscombe's Quartet

Anscombe's Quartet is a set of four datasets that have the same mean, variance and correlation but look very different.  It's easy to think that having a good set of summary statistics (like mean, variance and correlation) can tell you everything important about a dataset, or at least enough to know if two datasets are extremely similar or extremely different, but Anscombe's Quartet will always be standing behind you, laughing at how silly that idea is.

Anscombe's Quartet was devised in 1973 as an example of how summary statistics can be misleading, but today we can even do one better: the Datasaurus Dozen is a set of twelve datasets, all extremely visually distinct, that have the same summary stats as a source dataset that, there's no other way to put this, looks like a dinosaur.  It's an example of how datasets can be generated to look like almost anything while still preserving arbitrary summary statistics.  In other words, Anscombe's Quartets can be generated at-will and we all should be reminded to visualize our data (not just compute summary statistics) if we want to claim to really understand it.

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Re-release: Traffic Metering Algorithms

Originally release June 2016

This episode is for all you (us) traffic nerds--we're talking about the hidden structure underlying traffic on-ramp metering systems. These systems slow down the flow of traffic onto highways so that the highways don't get overloaded with cars and clog up. If you're someone who listens to podcasts while commuting, and especially if your area has on-ramp metering, you'll never look at highway access control the same way again (yeah, we know this is super nerdy; it's also super awesome).

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PageRank

The year: 1998.  The size of the web: 150 million pages.  The problem: information retrieval.  How do you find the "best" web pages to return in response to a query?  A graduate student named Larry Page had an idea for how it could be done better and created a search engine as a research project.  That search engine was called Google.

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Things You Learn When Building Models for Big Data

As more and more data gets collected seemingly every day, and data scientists use that data for modeling, the technical limits associated with machine learning on big datasets keep getting pushed back.  This week is a first-hand case study in using scikit-learn (a popular python machine learning library) on multi-terabyte datasets, which is something that Katie does a lot for her day job at Civis Analytics.  There are a lot of considerations for doing something like this--cloud computing, artful use of parallelization, considerations of model complexity, and the computational demands of training vs. prediction, to name just a few.  

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How to Find New Things to Learn

If you're anything like us, you a) always are curious to learn more about data science and machine learning and stuff, and b) are usually overwhelmed by how much content is out there (not all of it very digestible).  We hope this podcast is a part of the solution for you, but if you're looking to go farther (who isn't?) then we have a few new resources that are presenting high-quality content in a fresh, accessible way.  Boring old PDFs full of inscrutable math notation, your days are numbered!

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Federated Learning

As machine learning makes its way into more and more mobile devices, an interesting question presents itself: how can we have an algorithm learn from training data that's being supplied as users interact with the algorithm?  In other words, how do we do machine learning when the training dataset is distributed across many devices, imbalanced, and the usage associated with any one user needs to be obscured somewhat to protect the privacy of that user?  Enter Federated Learning, a set of related algorithms from Google that are designed to help out in exactly this scenario.  If you've used keyboard shortcuts or autocomplete on an Android phone, chances are you've encountered Federated Learning even if you didn't know it.

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Word2Vec

Word2Vec is probably the go-to algorithm for vectorizing text data these days.  Which makes sense, because it is wicked cool.  Word2Vec has it all: neural networks, skip-grams and bag-of-words implementations, a multiclass classifier that gets swapped out for a binary classifier, made-up dummy words, and a model that isn't actually used to predict anything (usually).  And all that's before we get to the part about how Word2Vec allows you to do algebra with text.  Seriously, this stuff is cool.

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Feature Processing for Text Analytics

It seems like every day there's more and more machine learning problems that involve learning on text data, but text itself makes for fairly lousy inputs to machine learning algorithms.  That's why there are text vectorization algorithms, which re-format text data so it's ready for using for machine learning.  In this episode, we'll go over some of the most common and useful ways to preprocess text data for machine learning.

Education Analytics

This week we'll hop into the rapidly developing industry around predictive analytics for education.  For many of the students who eventually drop out, data science is showing that there might be early warning signs that the student is in trouble--we'll talk about what some of those signs are, and then dig into the meatier questions around discrimination, who owns a student's data, and correlation vs. causation.  Spoiler: we have more questions than we have answers on this one.

Bonus appearance from Maeby the dog, who is pictured below (on her way home from the orphanage when she got adopted).

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A Technical Deep Dive on Stanley, the First Self-Driving Car

In our follow-up episode to last week's introduction to the first self-driving car, we will be doing a technical deep dive this week and talking about the most important systems for getting a car to drive itself 140 miles across the desert.  Lidar?  You betcha!  Drive-by-wire?  Of course!  Probabilistic terrain reconstruction?  Absolutely!  All this and more this week on Linear Digressions.

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